The social roles of bots and assisted editing programs

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Conference paper (help)
The social roles of bots and assisted editing programs
Authors: R. Stuart Geiger
Citation: Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration  : 30. 2009
Editors:
Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA
Meeting: WikiSym '09
Database(s):
DOI: 10.1145/1641309.1641351.
Link(s): http://wikisym.org/ws2009/procfiles/p129-geiger.pdf
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The social roles of bots and assisted editing tools examines the software programs the edit in Wikipedia.

The statistics in the paper was also partially reported in The work of sustaining order in Wikipedia: the banning of a vandal.

Contents

[edit] Data

Data collected from 4. February 2009 to 1. April 2009: 12,352,612 edits in total. Bots status were coded and assisted editing programs were detected "by the presence of various indicators"

[edit] Results

Previous results[1] from 2005 and 2006 indicated that on 2% to 4% edits were attributable to bots. For the 2009 dataset:

  • 16.33% were bot edits
  • 12.16% assisted edits
  • 28.03% anonymous edits

[edit] Related papers

  1. Power of the few vs. wisdom of the crowd: Wikipedia and the rise of the bourgeoisie
  2. The work of sustaining order in Wikipedia: the banning of a vandal

[edit] References

  1. Power of the few vs. wisdom of the crowd: Wikipedia and the rise of the bourgeoisie
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