Hippocampal volume in early onset depression

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Paper (help)
Hippocampal volume in early onset depression
Authors: Frank P. MacMaster, Vivek Kusumakar
Citation: BMC Medicine 2 : 2. 2004 January
Database(s): PubMed (PMID/14969587)
DOI: 10.1186/1741-7015-2-2.
Link(s): http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/2/2
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Hippocampal volume in early onset depression reports a neuroimaging study of the hippocampal volume in depressive and controls using magnetic resonance imaging

Subjects were scanned with 1.5 Tesla Siemens Magnetom Vision MRI scanner with a FLASH sequence and images were analyzed with NIHImage 1.62

Figures 1 and 2 are erroneously switched.

Contents

[edit] Abstract from the Open Access paper

[edit] Background

Abnormalities in limbic structures have been implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD). Although MDD is as common in adolescence as in adulthood, few studies have examined youth near illness onset in order to determine the possible influence of atypical development on the pathophysiology of this disorder.

[edit] Methods

Hippocampal volumes were measured in 17 MDD subjects (age = 16.67 ± 1.83 years [mean ± SD]; range = 13 – 18 years) and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (16.23 ± 1.61 years [mean ± SD]; 13 – 18 years) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

[edit] Results

An analysis of covariance revealed a significant difference between MDD and control subjects (F = 8.66, df = 1, 29, P = 0.006). This was more strongly localized to the left hippocampus (P = 0.001) than the right hippocampus (P = 0.047).

[edit] Conclusions

Our findings provide new evidence of abnormalities in the hippocampus in early onset depression. However, our results should be considered preliminary given the small sample size studied.

[edit] Subjects

Subject group #1 (help)
Major depressive disorder patients
Subjects/♂/♀: 17 / 8 / 9
Age: 16.67 ±1.83 (13–18)
Nationality: define nationality
Approval: IWK Research Ethics Board
Databases:

Group 1 of 17 major depressive disorder patients with 8 males and 9 females were included in the study. The group had a mean age of 16.67 with a range from 13 to 18.

The study on the human subjects was approved by the IWK Research Ethics Board.
Subject group #2 (help)
Healthy controls
Subjects/♂/♀: 17 / 8 / 9
Age: 16.23 ±1.61 (13–18)
Nationality: define nationality
Approval: IWK Research Ethics Board
Databases:

Group 2 of 17 healthy controls with 8 males and 9 females were included in the study. The group had a mean age of 16.23 with a range from 13 to 18. The study on the human subjects was approved by the IWK Research Ethics Board. Subjects were between 13 and 18 years old. Healthy controls were matched for sex and age.

[edit] Scanning

MRI Scanning (help)
Mode: sMRI
Scanner: Siemens Magnetom Vision 1.5T
Type: FLASH

(TR=25ms, TE=5ms, FA=40°)

Slices: 124 (thickness=1.5mm ) oriented coronal
Size: FOV=240mm matrix=256x256
Laboratory: missing laboratory

For sMRI FLASH scans were acquired with a 1.5T Siemens Magnetom Vision.


[edit] Results

The mean age is in the abstract — not the body text.
#
Mean
Std
SEM
Unit
Anatomy
Group
No. (M/F)
Age
1 3.05 0.11 cm3 Left hippocampus Controls 17 (8/9) (13–18)
2 2.53 0.09 cm3 Left hippocampus Major depressive disorder patients 17 (8/9) (13–18)
3 2.88 0.11 cm3 Right hippocampus Controls 17 (8/9) (13–18)
4 2.54 0.12 cm3 Right hippocampus Major depressive disorder patients 17 (8/9) (13–18)

[edit] Related studies

The researchers reference 14 other brain volume in depression studies (page 1):

  1. Hippocampal abnormalities in depression
  2. Hippocampal atrophy in recurrent major depression
  3. Depression duration but not age predicts hippocampal volume loss in medically healthy women with recurrent major depression
  4. Cortical grey matter reductions associated with treatment-resistant chronic unipolar depression. controlled magnetic resonance imaging study
  5. Hippocampal volume reduction in major depression
  6. Hippocampal volume in geriatric depression
  7. Quantitative MRI of the hippocampus and amygdala in severe depression
  8. Childbood trauma associated with smaller hippocampal volume in women with major depression
  9. Enlargement of the amygdala in patients with a first episode of major depression
  10. Hypercortisolemia and hippocampal changes in depression
  11. Quantitative cerebral anatomy in depression. a controlled magnetic resonance imaging study
  12. Hippocampal/amygdala volumes in geriatric depression
  13. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging in geriatric depression and primary degenerative dementia
  14. Hippocampal volume in primary unipolar major depression: a magnetic resonance imaging study
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