Human language reveals a universal positivity bias

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Human language reveals a universal positivity bias
Authors: Peter Sheridan Dodds, Eric M. Clark, Suma Desu, Morgan R. Frank, Andrew J. Reagan, Jake Ryland Williams, Lewis Mitchell, Kameron Decker Harris, Isabel M. Kloumann, James P. Bagrow, Karine Megerdoomian, Matthew T. McMahon, Brian F. Tivnan, Christopher M. Danforth
Citation: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112 (8): 2389-2394. 2015
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DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1411678112.
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Human language reveals a universal positivity bias investigates the "Pollyanna hypothesis"

A previous paper from the group looked at English only: Positivity of the English language.

The result in the paper has been critized:[1]

  1. Function words has a positive bias in LabMT, e.g., "the" and "of" is in the word list
  2. The response format with emoticons introduces measurement bias as "a nonsmiling facial expression is perceived as slightly negative"
  3. There is a language-dependent relationship between work frequency and happiness.

The concerns where answered in Reply to Garcia et al.: common mistakes in measuring frequency-dependent word characteristics.

[edit] Related papers

  1. Affective biases in English are bidimensional
  2. Positive words carry less information than negative words
  3. Positivity of the English language
  4. The language-dependent relationship between word happiness and frequency

[edit] References

  1. The language-dependent relationship between word happiness and frequency
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