WOROI: 77 - Pons
 
Bib -> Asymmetry | Author | ICA | NMF | Novelty | Statistics | SVD | Title | WOBIB ]
 
 
Roi -> Alphabetic | Hammers | Tzourio-Mazoyer | Svarer | Top | Functional areas | Brodmann areas ]
 
 
[ Brede Database ]
 


WOROI: 77 - Pons


External databases

MeSH UID: D011149
BrainInfo: 538
Wikipedia: Pons
ICBM Label: 251

Taxonomy

ParentsSiblingsChildren
Metencephalon
Brain stem
  Pontine tegmentum
Pontine cranial nerve nucleus

Talairach coordinates

  x     y     z   Lobar anatomy WOBIB WOEXP
2 -34 -25 Right pons 17 50
-6 -34 -28 Pons 96 300
-2 -28 -17 Left dorsal rostral pons 122 380
2 -33 -26 Right pons 157 483
-4 -34 -23 Left pons 157 483
2 -30 -23 Right pons 157 484
4 -26 -13 Right pons 157 485
-2 -26 -13 Left pons 157 485

Summary

  x     y     z   Description
-3 -31 -20 Mean coordinate in left hemisphere
2 -31 -22 Mean coordinate in right hemisphere
3 -31 -21 Mean coordinate with ignored left/right
2 -34 -28 Minimum coordinate with ignored left/right
6 -26 -13 Maximum coordinate with ignored left/right
2 4 6 Standard deviation with ignored left/right
corner cube of WOROI: 77 - Pons

Text contexts

Functional MRI (fMRI) was used to examine human brain activity within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during a sensorimotor task that had been proposed to require selection between several responses, a cognitive concept termed "willed action" in a positron emission tomography (PET) study by Frith et alF. Hyder; E. A. Phelps; C. J. Wiggins; K. S. Labar; A. M. Blamire; R. G. Shulman. "Willed action": a functional MRI study of the human prefrontal cortex during a sensorimotor task. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 94(13):6989-6994, 1997. PMID: 9192679. WOBIB: 6.
Response to a painful stimulus was elicited using a special CO2 laser, which selectively activates nociceptive receptors, to the hand and footX. Xu; H. Fukuyama; S. Yazawa; T. Mima; T. Hanakawa; Y. Magata; M. Kanda; N. Fujiwara; K. Shindo; T. Nagamine; H. Shibasaki. Functional localization of pain perception in the human brain studied by PET. NeuroReport 8(2):555-559, 1997. PMID: 9080447. WOBIB: 13.
Multiple brain areas, including bilateral secondary somatosensory cortices (SII) and insula, and the frontal lobe and thalamus contralateral to the stimulus side, were found to be involved in the response to painful stimulationX. Xu; H. Fukuyama; S. Yazawa; T. Mima; T. Hanakawa; Y. Magata; M. Kanda; N. Fujiwara; K. Shindo; T. Nagamine; H. Shibasaki. Functional localization of pain perception in the human brain studied by PET. NeuroReport 8(2):555-559, 1997. PMID: 9080447. WOBIB: 13.
It remains unclear whether the activated areas are responsible for the increase in cardiovascular variables, but neural feedback from the contracting muscles was not necessary for the activation in the mentioned areas during rhythmic handgripM. Nowak; K. S. Olsen; I. Law; Søren Holm; O. B. Paulson; N. H. Secher. Command-related distribution of regional cerebral blood flow during attempted handgrip. Journal of Applied Physiology 86(3):819-824, 1999. PMID: 10066691. WOBIB: 16.
Various neuropathological and animal studies have referred to the medulla oblongata, pons, limbic system, superior frontal lobe and premotor cortical regions as areas implicated in micturition controlS. Nour; Claus Svarer; J. K. Kristensen; O. B. Paulson; I. Law. Cerebral activation during micturition in normal men. Brain 123 ( Pt 4):781-9, 2000. PMID: 10734009. WOBIB: 17.
Moreover, direct gaze led to greater correlation between activity in the fusiform and the amygdala, a region associated with emotional responses and stimulus saliencyN. George; J. Driver; R. J. Dolan. Seen gaze-direction modulates fusiform activity and its coupling with other brain areas during face processing. NeuroImage 13(6 Pt 1):1102-12, 2001. PMID: 11352615. DOI: 10.1006/nimg.2001.0769. WOBIB: 18.
A parametric method is proposed to examine the relationship between neuronal activity, measured with event related potentials (ERPs), and the hemodynamic response, observed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), during an auditory oddball paradigmSilvina Horovitz; Pawel Skudlarski; John Gore. Correlations and dissociations between BOLD signal and P300 amplitude in an auditory oddball task: a parametric approach to combining fMRI and ERP. Magnetic Resonance Imaging 20(4):319, 2002. PMID: 12165350. WOBIB: 19.
After verifying that the amplitude of the evoked response P300 increases as the probability of oddball target presentation decreases, we explored the corresponding effect of target frequency on the fMRI signalSilvina Horovitz; Pawel Skudlarski; John Gore. Correlations and dissociations between BOLD signal and P300 amplitude in an auditory oddball task: a parametric approach to combining fMRI and ERP. Magnetic Resonance Imaging 20(4):319, 2002. PMID: 12165350. WOBIB: 19.
We postulated that those regions that increased activation with decreasing probability might be responsible for the corresponding changes in the P300 amplitudeSilvina Horovitz; Pawel Skudlarski; John Gore. Correlations and dissociations between BOLD signal and P300 amplitude in an auditory oddball task: a parametric approach to combining fMRI and ERP. Magnetic Resonance Imaging 20(4):319, 2002. PMID: 12165350. WOBIB: 19.
This study thus shows how combining fMRI and ERP in a parametric design identifies task-relevant sources of activity and allows separation of regions that have different response propertiesSilvina Horovitz; Pawel Skudlarski; John Gore. Correlations and dissociations between BOLD signal and P300 amplitude in an auditory oddball task: a parametric approach to combining fMRI and ERP. Magnetic Resonance Imaging 20(4):319, 2002. PMID: 12165350. WOBIB: 19.
The latter condition was intended to control for auditory comprehension, attentional demands, decision-making, the motoric response, and any common retrieval processesSterling C. Johnson; Leslie C. Baxter; Lana S. Wilder; James G. Pipe; Joseph E. Heiserman; George P. Prigatano. Neural correlates of self-reflection. Brain 125(Pt 8):1808-14, 2002. PMID: 12135971. WOBIB: 20.
In the resting state of normal consciousness (compared with meditation as a baseline), differential activity was found in dorso-lateral and orbital frontal cortex, anterior cingulate gyri, left temporal gyri, left inferior parietal lobule, striatal and thalamic regions, pons and cerebellar vermis and hemispheres, structures thought to support an executive attentional networkH. C. Lou; Troels W. Kjaer; Lars Friberg; G. Wildschiodtz; Søren Holm; Markus Nowak. A 15O-H2O PET study of meditation and the resting state of normal consciousness. Human Brain Mapping 7(2):98-105, 1999. PMID: 9950067. WOBIB: 22.
We were interested in the modulatory effect of attention to visual motion on cortical responses as measured by functional MRIChristian Büchel; Oliver Josephs; G. Rees; R. Turner; C. D. Frith; Karl J. Friston. The functional anatomy of attention to visual motion. A functional MRI study. Brain 121 ( Pt 7):1281-94, 1998. PMID: 9679780. WOBIB: 24.
Enhanced haemodynamic responses during attentive conditions defined an occipitoparietofrontal system, including sensory and association areas, as well as the medial thalamus and superior colliculusChristian Büchel; Oliver Josephs; G. Rees; R. Turner; C. D. Frith; Karl J. Friston. The functional anatomy of attention to visual motion. A functional MRI study. Brain 121 ( Pt 7):1281-94, 1998. PMID: 9679780. WOBIB: 24.
Attention-related enhancement of cortical responsiveness is discussed in terms of data that implicate modulatory short-term changes in synaptic efficacy and reciprocal connections between striate, extrastriate, parietal and frontal areasChristian Büchel; Oliver Josephs; G. Rees; R. Turner; C. D. Frith; Karl J. Friston. The functional anatomy of attention to visual motion. A functional MRI study. Brain 121 ( Pt 7):1281-94, 1998. PMID: 9679780. WOBIB: 24.
The changes in neural activation were closely mimicked by the performance data which showed a right ear superiority in response accuracy for the CV-syllables, and a left ear superiority for the musical instrumentsK. Hugdahl; K. Bronnick; S. Kyllingsbaek; I. Law; Anders Gade; Olaf B. Paulson. Brain activation during dichotic presentations of consonant-vowel and musical instrument stimuli: a 15O-PET study. Neuropsychologia 37(4):431-40, 1999. PMID: 10215090. WOBIB: 26.
The response in the PPA to scenes with spatial layout but no discrete objects (empty rooms) is as strong as the response to complex meaningful scenes containing multiple objects (the same rooms furnished) and over twice as strong as the response to arrays of multiple objects without three-dimensional spatial context (the furniture from these rooms on a blank background)R. Epstein; N. Kanwisher. A cortical representation of the local visual environment. Nature 392(6676):598-601, 1998. PMID: 9560155. DOI: 10.1038/33402. WOBIB: 27.
This response is reduced if the surfaces in the scene are rearranged so that they no longer define a coherent spaceR. Epstein; N. Kanwisher. A cortical representation of the local visual environment. Nature 392(6676):598-601, 1998. PMID: 9560155. DOI: 10.1038/33402. WOBIB: 27.
We also found category-related responses in the dorsal occipital cortex and in the superior temporal sulcusA. Ishai; L. G. Ungerleider; A. Martin; J. V. Haxby. The representation of objects in the human occipital and temporal cortex. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12 Suppl 2:35-51, 2000. PMID: 11506646. DOI: 10.1162/089892900564055. FMRIDCID: 2-2000-1113D. WOBIB: 28.
Moreover, rather than activating discrete, segregated areas, each category was associated with its own differential pattern of response across a broad expanse of cortexA. Ishai; L. G. Ungerleider; A. Martin; J. V. Haxby. The representation of objects in the human occipital and temporal cortex. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12 Suppl 2:35-51, 2000. PMID: 11506646. DOI: 10.1162/089892900564055. FMRIDCID: 2-2000-1113D. WOBIB: 28.
The distributed patterns of response were similar across tasks (passive viewing, delayed matching) and presentation formats (photographs, line drawings)A. Ishai; L. G. Ungerleider; A. Martin; J. V. Haxby. The representation of objects in the human occipital and temporal cortex. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12 Suppl 2:35-51, 2000. PMID: 11506646. DOI: 10.1162/089892900564055. FMRIDCID: 2-2000-1113D. WOBIB: 28.
Perception & Psychophysics, 16, 143--149], provides a means to selectively manipulate the presence or absence of response competition while keeping other task demands constantE. Hazeltine; Russell Poldrack; John D. E. Gabrieli. Neural activation during response competition. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12(Supplement 2):118-29, 2000. PMID: 11506652. DOI: 10.1162/089892900563984. FMRIDCID: 2-2000-11173. WOBIB: 40.
In accordance with previous behavioral studies, trials in which the flanking stimuli indicated a different response than the central stimulus were performed significantly more slowly than trials in which all the stimuli indicated the same responseE. Hazeltine; Russell Poldrack; John D. E. Gabrieli. Neural activation during response competition. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12(Supplement 2):118-29, 2000. PMID: 11506652. DOI: 10.1162/089892900563984. FMRIDCID: 2-2000-11173. WOBIB: 40.
The increases were not due to changes in stimulus complexity or the need to overcome previously learned associations between stimuli and responsesE. Hazeltine; Russell Poldrack; John D. E. Gabrieli. Neural activation during response competition. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12(Supplement 2):118-29, 2000. PMID: 11506652. DOI: 10.1162/089892900563984. FMRIDCID: 2-2000-11173. WOBIB: 40.
Correspondences between this study and other experiments manipulating response interference suggest that the frontal foci may be related to response inhibition processes whereas the posterior foci may be related to the activation of representations of the inappropriate responsesE. Hazeltine; Russell Poldrack; John D. E. Gabrieli. Neural activation during response competition. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12(Supplement 2):118-29, 2000. PMID: 11506652. DOI: 10.1162/089892900563984. FMRIDCID: 2-2000-11173. WOBIB: 40.
Moreover, their response to stimuli degraded by frequency filtering paralleled the subjects' behavioural performance in voice-perception tasks that used these stimuliP. Belin; Robert J. Zatorre; P. Lafaille; P. Ahad; B. Pike. Voice-selective areas in human auditory cortex. Nature 403(6767):309-12, 2000. PMID: 10659849. DOI: 10.1038/35002078. WOBIB: 42.
We have examined the activity levels produced in various areas of the human occipital cortex in response to various motion stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methodsA. T. Smith; M. W. Greenlee; K. D. Singh; F. M. Kraemer; J. Hennig. The processing of first- and second-order motion in human visual cortex assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Journal of Neuroscience 18(10):3816-30, 1998. PMID: 9570811. WOBIB: 53.
Areas V1 and V2 give good responses to all motion stimuli, but the activity seems to be related primarily to the local spatial and temporal structure in the image rather than to motion processingA. T. Smith; M. W. Greenlee; K. D. Singh; F. M. Kraemer; J. Hennig. The processing of first- and second-order motion in human visual cortex assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Journal of Neuroscience 18(10):3816-30, 1998. PMID: 9570811. WOBIB: 53.
Unlike V1 and V2, the response in V3 and VP is significantly greater for second-order motion than for first-order motionA. T. Smith; M. W. Greenlee; K. D. Singh; F. M. Kraemer; J. Hennig. The processing of first- and second-order motion in human visual cortex assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Journal of Neuroscience 18(10):3816-30, 1998. PMID: 9570811. WOBIB: 53.
The combination of these sites differs from those in previous studies of emotion, suggesting that a unique network of areas is responsible for evoking this affective stateAndreas Bartels; Semir Zeki. The neural basis of romantic love. NeuroReport 11(17):3829-3834, 2000. PMID: 11117499. WOBIB: 54.
It seems that there is a capacity for local plastic change in the structure of the healthy adult human brain in response to environmental demandsE. A. Maguire; D. G. Gadian; I. S. Johnsrude; C. D. Good; J. Ashburner; Richard S. J. Frackowiak; C. D. Frith. Navigation-related structural change in the hippocampi of taxi drivers. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97(8):4398-403, 2000. PMID: 10716738. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.070039597. WOBIB: 63.
The neural response to facial expressions of disgust in others is thus closely related to appraisal of distasteful stimuliMary L. Phillips; A. W. Young; C. Senior; M. Brammer; C. Andrew; A. J. Calder; E. T. Bullmore; D. I. Perrett; D. Rowland; Steven C. R. Williams; J. A. Gray; Anthony S. David. A specific neural substrate for perceiving facial expressions of disgust. Nature 389(6650):495-8, 1997. PMID: 9333238. DOI: 10.1038/39051. WOBIB: 71.
In this study, we used positron emission tomography in 11 healthy volunteers to identify the brain areas in which hypnosis modulates cerebral responses to a noxious stimulusM. E. Faymonville; S. Laureys; C. Degueldre; G. DelFiore; A. Luxen; G. Franck; M. Lamy; P. Maquet. Neural mechanisms of antinociceptive effects of hypnosis. Anesthesiology 92(5):1257-67, 2000. PMID: 10781270. WOBIB: 76.
We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (efMRI) to investigate brain regions showing differential responses as a function of confidence in an episodic word recognition taskR. N. Henson; Michael D. Rugg; T. Shallice; R. J. Dolan. Confidence in recognition memory for words: dissociating right prefrontal roles in episodic retrieval. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12(6):913-23, 2000. PMID: 11177413. WOBIB: 80.
Hemodynamic responses associated with each judgment were modeled with an "early" and a "late" response functionR. N. Henson; Michael D. Rugg; T. Shallice; R. J. Dolan. Confidence in recognition memory for words: dissociating right prefrontal roles in episodic retrieval. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12(6):913-23, 2000. PMID: 11177413. WOBIB: 80.
Journal of Neuroscience, 19, 3962-3972], a right dorsolateral prefrontal region showed a greater response to correct low- versus correct high-confidence judgementsR. N. Henson; Michael D. Rugg; T. Shallice; R. J. Dolan. Confidence in recognition memory for words: dissociating right prefrontal roles in episodic retrieval. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12(6):913-23, 2000. PMID: 11177413. WOBIB: 80.
Several regions, including the precuneus, posterior cingulate, and left lateral parietal cortex, showed greater responses to correct old than correct new judgementsR. N. Henson; Michael D. Rugg; T. Shallice; R. J. Dolan. Confidence in recognition memory for words: dissociating right prefrontal roles in episodic retrieval. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12(6):913-23, 2000. PMID: 11177413. WOBIB: 80.
These functions are discussed in relation to a monitoring process, which operates when familiarity levels are close to response criterion and is associated with nonconfident judgements, and a recollective process, which is associated with the confident recognition of old wordsR. N. Henson; Michael D. Rugg; T. Shallice; R. J. Dolan. Confidence in recognition memory for words: dissociating right prefrontal roles in episodic retrieval. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12(6):913-23, 2000. PMID: 11177413. WOBIB: 80.
Using H2 15O PET, we studied brain responses to such predictable sensory events (tones) and to similar unpredictable events and especially how the processing of predictable sensory events is modified by the context of a causative self-generated actionS. J. Blakemore; G. Rees; C. D. Frith. How do we predict the consequences of our actions? A functional imaging study. Neuropsychologia 36(6):521-9, 1998. PMID: 9705062. WOBIB: 82.
Since directing attention away from a painful stimulus is known to reduce the perceived pain intensity, we hypothesized that distraction from pain would result both in decreased activation of ACG subregions responsive to painful stimulation and increased activation of ACG subregions responsive to the distraction taskU. N. Frankenstein; W. Richter; M. C. McIntyre; F. Remy. Distraction modulates anterior cingulate gyrus activations during the cold pressor test. NeuroImage 14(4):827-36, 2001. PMID: 11554801. DOI: 10.1006/nimg.2001.0883. WOBIB: 83.
BOLD fMRI has comparatively high spatial resolution and allows for better identification of ACG subregional responses than other neuroimaging techniquesU. N. Frankenstein; W. Richter; M. C. McIntyre; F. Remy. Distraction modulates anterior cingulate gyrus activations during the cold pressor test. NeuroImage 14(4):827-36, 2001. PMID: 11554801. DOI: 10.1006/nimg.2001.0883. WOBIB: 83.
These data suggest that distraction from pain and concomitant low pain ratings are reflected in distinct ACG subregional responsesU. N. Frankenstein; W. Richter; M. C. McIntyre; F. Remy. Distraction modulates anterior cingulate gyrus activations during the cold pressor test. NeuroImage 14(4):827-36, 2001. PMID: 11554801. DOI: 10.1006/nimg.2001.0883. WOBIB: 83.
The present finding is in strong contrast with the attenuation (gating) of the response at the primary sensorimotor area (SM1) and suggests that the voluntary movements differently modulate the somatosensory functions of SMA and SM1T. Mima; A. Ikeda; S. Yazawa; T. Kunieda; T. Nagamine; W. Taki; H. Shibasaki. Somesthetic function of supplementary motor area during voluntary movements. NeuroReport 10(9):1859-62, 1999. PMID: 10501521. WOBIB: 84.
Power analyses for voxels showing maximal decline over the 1-year period in regional cerebral glucose metabolism (mg/100 g per minute) were computed to estimate the sample sizes needed to detect a significant treatment response in a 1-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled treatment studyGene E. Alexander; Kewei Chen; Pietro Pietrini; Stanley I. Rapoport; Eric M. Reiman. Longitudinal PET Evaluation of Cerebral Metabolic Decline in Dementia: A Potential Outcome Measure in Alzheimer's Disease Treatment Studies. American Journal of Psychiatry 159(5):738-45, 2002. PMID: 11986126. WOBIB: 91.
Using maximal glucose metabolism reductions in the left frontal cortex, we estimated that as few as 36 patients per group would be needed to detect a 33% treatment response with one-tailed significance of pGene E. Alexander; Kewei Chen; Pietro Pietrini; Stanley I. Rapoport; Eric M. Reiman. Longitudinal PET Evaluation of Cerebral Metabolic Decline in Dementia: A Potential Outcome Measure in Alzheimer's Disease Treatment Studies. American Journal of Psychiatry 159(5):738-45, 2002. PMID: 11986126. WOBIB: 91.
Because these areas also support anticipation, affect, and locomotion, electrodermal responses seem to reflect cognitively or emotionally mediated motor preparationM. Fredrikson; T. Furmark; M. T. Olsson; Håkan Fischer; J. Andersson; B. Langstrom. Functional neuroanatomical correlates of electrodermal activity: a positron emission tomographic study. Psychophysiology 35(2):179-85, 1998. PMID: 9529944. WOBIB: 94.
Overall, the results reveal that 1) the pattern of brain activation and the perception of heat pain both change during repetitive noxious heat stimulation, 2) cortical activity can be detected before subcortical responses appear, and 3) timing the stimulation with respect to the scan period can, together with psychophysical measurements, identify brain structures that are likely to participate in the perception of painK. L. Casey; T. J. Morrow; J. Lorenz; S. Minoshima. Temporal and spatial dynamics of human forebrain activity during heat pain: analysis by positron emission tomography. Journal of Neurophysiology 85(2):951-9, 2001. PMID: 11160525. WOBIB: 95.
Measures of heart rate, electrodermal activity, state anxiety and subjective distress confirmed classical conditioning of physiological and subjective responsesM. Fredrikson; G. Wik; Håkan Fischer; J. Andersson. Affective and attentive neural networks in humans: a PET study of Pavlovian conditioning. NeuroReport 7(1):97-101, 1995. PMID: 8742426. WOBIB: 99.
The localization of relative rCBF changes suggests different roles for the cingulate cortex in pain processing: (i) elevated rCBF in area 24' may be involved in response selection like nocifensive reflex inhibition; (ii) activation of the perigenual cortex may participate in affective responses to noxious stimuli like suffering associated with pain; and (iii) reduced rCBF in areas 8 and 32 may enhance pain perception in the perigenual cortex, while that in the PCC may disengage visually guided processesBrent A. Vogt; Stuart Derbyshire; Anthony K. Jones. Pain processing in four regions of human cingulate cortex localized with co-registered PET and MR imaging. European Journal of Neuroscience 8(7):1461-73, 1996. PMID: 8758953. WOBIB: 100.
Given the inhibitory effects of opioids on neuronal activity, we predicted that fentanyl's analgesic effects would be associated with suppression of pain-evoked responses in these distinct brain areasL. J. Adler; F. E. Gyulai; D. J. Diehl; M. A. Mintun; P. M. Winter; L. L. Firestone. Regional brain activity changes associated with fentanyl analgesia elucidated by positron emission tomography. Anesthesia & Analgesia 84(1):120-126, 1997. PMID: 8989012. WOBIB: 101.
To test this, PET was used to measure cerebral blood flow responses, as reflections of regional neuronal activity, to painful and nonpainful thermal stimuli both in the absence and presence of fentanyl in humansL. J. Adler; F. E. Gyulai; D. J. Diehl; M. A. Mintun; P. M. Winter; L. L. Firestone. Regional brain activity changes associated with fentanyl analgesia elucidated by positron emission tomography. Anesthesia & Analgesia 84(1):120-126, 1997. PMID: 8989012. WOBIB: 101.
In contrast to our hypothesis, these data indicate that fentanyl analgesia involves augmentation of pain-evoked cerebral responses in certain areas, as well as both activation and inhibition in other brain regions unresponsive to pain stimulation aloneL. J. Adler; F. E. Gyulai; D. J. Diehl; M. A. Mintun; P. M. Winter; L. L. Firestone. Regional brain activity changes associated with fentanyl analgesia elucidated by positron emission tomography. Anesthesia & Analgesia 84(1):120-126, 1997. PMID: 8989012. WOBIB: 101.
The pattern in single subjects was broadly similar, although individual differences in neural response were also observedPhilip K. McGuire; C. J. Bench; C. D. Frith; I. M. Marks; Richard S. J. Frackowiak; R. J. Dolan. Functional anatomy of obsessive-compulsive phenomena. British Journal of Psychiatry 164(4):459-468, 1994. PMID: 8038933. WOBIB: 104.
For pleasurable stimuli, these findings suggest that predictability modulates the response of human reward regions, and subjective preference can be dissociated from this responseG. S. Berns; Samuel M. McClure; G. Pagnoni; P. R. Montague. Predictability modulates human brain response to reward. Journal of Neuroscience 21(8):2793-8, 2001. PMID: 11306631. WOBIB: 107.
We now report that individuals with one or two copies of the short allele of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) promoter polymorphism, which has been associated with reduced 5-HTT expression and function and increased fear and anxiety-related behaviors, exhibit greater amygdala neuronal activity, as assessed by BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging, in response to fearful stimuli compared with individuals homozygous for the long alleleAhmad R. Hariri; Venkata S. Mattay; Alessandro Tessitore; Bhaskar Kolachana; Francesco Fera; David Goldman; Michael F. Egan; Daniel R. Weinberger. Serotonin transporter genetic variation and the response of the human amygdala. Science 297(5580):400-3, 2002. PMID: 12130784. DOI: 10.1126/science.1071829. WOBIB: 115.
These results demonstrate genetically driven variation in the response of brain regions underlying human emotional behavior and suggest that differential excitability of the amygdala to emotional stimuli may contribute to the increased fear and anxiety typically associated with the short SLC6A4 alleleAhmad R. Hariri; Venkata S. Mattay; Alessandro Tessitore; Bhaskar Kolachana; Francesco Fera; David Goldman; Michael F. Egan; Daniel R. Weinberger. Serotonin transporter genetic variation and the response of the human amygdala. Science 297(5580):400-3, 2002. PMID: 12130784. DOI: 10.1126/science.1071829. WOBIB: 115.
The anterior cingulate focus did not display such a relationship in our tasks and is likely to mediate other aspects of attentional deployment such as performance monitoring, response selection or target identificationM. M. Mesulam; A. C. Nobre; Y. H. Kim; T. B. Parrish; D. R. Gitelman. Heterogeneity of cingulate contributions to spatial attention. NeuroImage 13(6 Pt 1):1065-72, 2001. PMID: 11352612. DOI: 10.1006/nimg.2001.0768. WOBIB: 120.
This leads us to suggest that each specialized area is directly responsible for the creation of a feature-specific conscious percept (a microconsciousness)Andreas Bartels; Semir Zeki. Functional brain mapping during free viewing of natural scenes. Human Brain Mapping 21(2):75-85, 2004. PMID: 14755595. DOI: 10.1002/hbm.10153. WOBIB: 123.
This (i) enabled the segregation of brain regions showing differential responses, (ii) identified the optimum experimental design parameters for maximizing sensitivity, and (iii) allowed us to evaluate further the sources of discrepancy between positron emission tomography (PET) and fMRI signalsAndrea Mechelli; Karl J. Friston; Cathy J. Price. The effects of presentation rate during word and pseudoword reading: a comparison of PET and fMRI. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12 Suppl 2():145-156, 2000. PMID: 11506654. DOI: 10.1162/089892900564000. FMRIDCID: 2-2000-11189. WOBIB: 129.
These findings replicate the results of the previous PET study, confirming that activation in regions associated with visual processing and response generation increases with the number of stimuliAndrea Mechelli; Karl J. Friston; Cathy J. Price. The effects of presentation rate during word and pseudoword reading: a comparison of PET and fMRI. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12 Suppl 2():145-156, 2000. PMID: 11506654. DOI: 10.1162/089892900564000. FMRIDCID: 2-2000-11189. WOBIB: 129.
To understand spatial summation of pain processing in the brain, we investigated the cerebral evoked responses to non-painful and painful contact heat stimulation (70 degrees C/s fast onset; intensity 2,4,6, corresponding to the individual's non-, slight and moderate pain) comparing one (1s) vsAndrew C. N. Chen; David M. Niddam; Helen J. Crawford; Robert Oostenveld; Lars Arendt-Nielsen. Spatial summation of pain processing in the human brain as assessed by cerebral event related potentials. Neuroscience Letters 328(2):190-194, 2002. PMID: 12133585. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 136.
The neuroendocrine and cerebral metabolic response to the acute administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram (40mg, IV), was measured in 17 normal control subjects using positron emission tomography (PET) to evaluate changes in serotonin function with normal agingSara Goldberg; Gwenn S. Smith; Anna Barnes; Yilong Ma; Elisse Kramer; Kimberly Robeson; Margaret Kirshner; Bruce G. Pollock; David Eidelberg. Serotonin modulation of cerebral glucose metabolism in normal aging. Neurobiology of Aging 25(2):167-174, 2004. PMID: 14749134. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 138.
By adapting functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning parameters to maximize sensitivity to medial temporal lobe activity, we demonstrate that left perirhinal and hippocampal responses during word list encoding are greater for subsequently recalled than forgotten wordsB. A. Strange; L. J. Otten; Oliver Josephs; Michael D. Rugg; Raymond J. Dolan. Dissociable human perirhinal, hippocampal, and parahippocampal roles during verbal encoding. Journal of Neuroscience 22(2):523-528, 2002. PMID: 11784798. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 142.
Although perirhinal responses predict memory for all words, successful encoding of initial words in a list, demonstrating a primacy effect, is associated with parahippocampal and anterior hippocampal activationB. A. Strange; L. J. Otten; Oliver Josephs; Michael D. Rugg; Raymond J. Dolan. Dissociable human perirhinal, hippocampal, and parahippocampal roles during verbal encoding. Journal of Neuroscience 22(2):523-528, 2002. PMID: 11784798. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 142.
Encoding-related parahippocampal and anterior hippocampal responses for initial, remembered words most likely reflects enhanced attentional orienting to these positionally distinctive itemsB. A. Strange; L. J. Otten; Oliver Josephs; Michael D. Rugg; Raymond J. Dolan. Dissociable human perirhinal, hippocampal, and parahippocampal roles during verbal encoding. Journal of Neuroscience 22(2):523-528, 2002. PMID: 11784798. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 142.
A parametric haemodynamic response model (or regression analysis) confirmed a task-difficulty-dependent increase of BOLD and rCBF for the cerebellum and the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortexUlrich Schall; Patrick Johnston; Jim Lagopoulos; Markus Juptner; Walter Jentzen; Renate Thienel; Alexandra Dittmann-Balcar; Stefan Bender; Philip B. Ward. Functional brain maps of Tower of London performance: a positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging study. NeuroImage 20(2):1154-61, 2003. PMID: 14568484. DOI: 10.1016/S1053-8119(03)00338-0. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 144.
We used event-related functional magnetic-resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify brain regions responsive to changes in visual, auditory and tactile stimuliJ. Downar; A. P. Crawley; D. J. Mikulis; K. D. Davis. A multimodal cortical network for the detection of changes in the sensory environment. Nature Neuroscience 3(3):277-283, 2000. PMID: 10700261. DOI: 10.1038/72991. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 148.
Multimodally responsive areas comprised a right-lateralized network including the temporoparietal junction, inferior frontal gyrus, insula and left cingulate and supplementary motor areasJ. Downar; A. P. Crawley; D. J. Mikulis; K. D. Davis. A multimodal cortical network for the detection of changes in the sensory environment. Nature Neuroscience 3(3):277-283, 2000. PMID: 10700261. DOI: 10.1038/72991. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 148.
These behavioural features of crossmodal processing appear to have parallels in the response properties of multisensory cells in the superior colliculi and cerebral cortex of non-human mammalsGemma A. Calvert; Ruth Campbell; Michael J. Brammer. Evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging of crossmodal binding in the human heteromodal cortex. Current Biology 10(11):649-657, 2000. PMID: 10837246. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 154.
Although spatially concordant multisensory inputs can produce a dramatic, often multiplicative, increase in cellular activity, spatially disparate cues tend to induce a profound response depressionGemma A. Calvert; Ruth Campbell; Michael J. Brammer. Evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging of crossmodal binding in the human heteromodal cortex. Current Biology 10(11):649-657, 2000. PMID: 10837246. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 154.
Brain activations to matched and mismatched audio-visual inputs were contrasted with the combined response to both unimodal conditionsGemma A. Calvert; Ruth Campbell; Michael J. Brammer. Evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging of crossmodal binding in the human heteromodal cortex. Current Biology 10(11):649-657, 2000. PMID: 10837246. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 154.
This strategy identified an area of heteromodal cortex in the left superior temporal sulcus that exhibited significant supra-additive response enhancement to matched audio-visual inputs and a corresponding sub-additive response to mismatched inputsGemma A. Calvert; Ruth Campbell; Michael J. Brammer. Evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging of crossmodal binding in the human heteromodal cortex. Current Biology 10(11):649-657, 2000. PMID: 10837246. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 154.
They further suggest that response enhancement and depression may be a general property of multisensory integration operating at different levels of the neuroaxis and irrespective of the purpose for which sensory inputs are combinedGemma A. Calvert; Ruth Campbell; Michael J. Brammer. Evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging of crossmodal binding in the human heteromodal cortex. Current Biology 10(11):649-657, 2000. PMID: 10837246. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 154.
Therefore, we hypothesised that in healthy subjects ketamine would elicit neural responses to emotional stimuli which mimicked those reported in depersonalization disorder and schizophreniaKathryn M. Abel; Matthew P. G. Allin; Katarzyna Kucharska-Pietura; Anthony S. David; Chris Andrew; Steven C. R. Williams; Michael J. Brammer; Mary L. Phillips. Ketamine alters neural processing of facial emotion recognition in healthy men: an fMRI study. NeuroReport 14(3):387-391, 2003. PMID: 12634489. DOI: 10.1097/01.wnr.0000058031.29600.31. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 155.
The normal pattern of neural response occurred in limbic and visual cortex to fearful faces during the placebo infusionKathryn M. Abel; Matthew P. G. Allin; Katarzyna Kucharska-Pietura; Anthony S. David; Chris Andrew; Steven C. R. Williams; Michael J. Brammer; Mary L. Phillips. Ketamine alters neural processing of facial emotion recognition in healthy men: an fMRI study. NeuroReport 14(3):387-391, 2003. PMID: 12634489. DOI: 10.1097/01.wnr.0000058031.29600.31. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 155.
However, with ketamine, neural responses were demonstrated to neutral expressions in visual cortex, cerebellum and left posterior cingulate gyrusKathryn M. Abel; Matthew P. G. Allin; Katarzyna Kucharska-Pietura; Anthony S. David; Chris Andrew; Steven C. R. Williams; Michael J. Brammer; Mary L. Phillips. Ketamine alters neural processing of facial emotion recognition in healthy men: an fMRI study. NeuroReport 14(3):387-391, 2003. PMID: 12634489. DOI: 10.1097/01.wnr.0000058031.29600.31. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 155.
Emotional blunting may be associated with reduced limbic responses to emotional stimuli and a relative increase in the visual cortical response to neutral stimuliKathryn M. Abel; Matthew P. G. Allin; Katarzyna Kucharska-Pietura; Anthony S. David; Chris Andrew; Steven C. R. Williams; Michael J. Brammer; Mary L. Phillips. Ketamine alters neural processing of facial emotion recognition in healthy men: an fMRI study. NeuroReport 14(3):387-391, 2003. PMID: 12634489. DOI: 10.1097/01.wnr.0000058031.29600.31. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 155.
Results demonstrated that, relative to an emotionally Neutral state, both the Sad and the Happy states were associated with significant loci of activation, bilaterally, in the orbitofrontal cortex, and in the left medial prefrontal cortex, left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, left anterior temporal pole, and right ponsMario Pelletier; Alain Bouthillier; Johanne Levesque; Serge Carrier; Claude Breault; Vincent Paquette; Boualem Mensour; Jean-Maxime Leroux; Gilles Beaudoin; Pierre Bourgouin; Mario Beauregard. Separate neural circuits for primary emotions? Brain activity during self-induced sadness and happiness in professional actors. NeuroReport 14(8):1111-1116, 2003. PMID: 12821792. DOI: 10.1097/01.wnr.0000075421.59944.69. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 157.
Significant response enhancements in auditory (BA 41/42) and visual (V5) cortices were detected during bimodal stimulationGemma A. Calvert; Michael J. Brammer; Edward T. Bullmore; Ruth Campbell; S. D. Iversen; Anthony S. David. Response amplification in sensory-specific cortices during crossmodal binding. NeuroReport 10(12):2619-2623, 1999. PMID: 10574380. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 164.
This study investigated the cortical response to hearing threat-related and neutral words using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 16 coronal planesRichard J. Maddock; Michael H. Buonocore. Activation of left posterior cingulate gyrus by the auditory presentation of threat-related words: an fMRI study. Psychiatry Research 75(1):1-14, 1997. PMID: 9287369. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 165.
The medial temporal lobe (MTL) has been associated with declarative learning of flexible relational rules and the basal ganglia with implicit learning of stimulus-response mappingsMichael Rose; Hilde Haider; Cornelius Weiller; Christian Buchel. The Role of Medial Temporal Lobe Structures in Implicit Learning: An Event-Related fMRI Study. Neuron 36(6):1221-1231, 2002. PMID: 12495634. DOI: 10.1016/S0896-6273(02)01105-4. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 167.
Implicit learning of the sequential regularities of the "hidden rule" activated the ventral perirhinal cortex, within the MTL, whereas learning the fixed stimulus-response associations activated the basal ganglia, indicating that the function of the MTL and the basal ganglia depends on the learned material and not necessarily on the participants' awarenessMichael Rose; Hilde Haider; Cornelius Weiller; Christian Buchel. The Role of Medial Temporal Lobe Structures in Implicit Learning: An Event-Related fMRI Study. Neuron 36(6):1221-1231, 2002. PMID: 12495634. DOI: 10.1016/S0896-6273(02)01105-4. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 167.
We hypothesized that panic patients would show increased response to threat-related stimuli in the posterior cingulate cortexRichard J. Maddock; Michael H. Buonocore; Shawn J. Kile; Amy S. Garrett. Brain regions showing increased activation by threat-related words in panic disorder. NeuroReport 14(3):325-328, 2003. PMID: 12634477. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 168.
The increased responsivity observed in the posterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices is consistent with the hypothesis that panic disorder patients engage in more extensive memory processing of threat-related stimuliRichard J. Maddock; Michael H. Buonocore; Shawn J. Kile; Amy S. Garrett. Brain regions showing increased activation by threat-related words in panic disorder. NeuroReport 14(3):325-328, 2003. PMID: 12634477. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 168.
The left inferior frontal and left superior temporal regions (Broca's and Wernicke's areas), along with the right inferior frontal cortex, demonstrated a convex response to speech compression; their activity increased as compression increased, but then decreased when speech became incomprehensibleRussell A. Poldrack; Elise Temple; Athanassios Protopapas; Srikantan Nagarajan; Paula Tallal; Michael Merzenich; John D. E. Gabrieli. Relations Between the Neural Bases of Dynamic Auditory Processing and Phonological Processing: Evidence from fMRI. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 13(5):687-697, 2001. PMID: 11506664. FMRIDCID: 2-2001-111KR. WOBIB: 171.
The left posterior middle temporal region, anterior to V5/MT, has been shown to be responsive both to images with implied motion, to simulated motion, and to motion verbsMikkel Wallentin; Torben Ellegaard Lund; Svend Østergaard; Leif Østergaard; Andreas Roepstorff. Motion verb sentences activate left posterior middle temporal cortex despite static context. NeuroReport 16(5):649-652, 2005. PMID: 15812326. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 175.
In this study, we investigated whether sentence context alters the response of the left posterior middle temporal regionMikkel Wallentin; Torben Ellegaard Lund; Svend Østergaard; Leif Østergaard; Andreas Roepstorff. Motion verb sentences activate left posterior middle temporal cortex despite static context. NeuroReport 16(5):649-652, 2005. PMID: 15812326. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 175.
These findings suggest that general intellectual ability in healthy young people is related to specific brain regions known to be involved in the executive control of attention, working memory, and response selectionSophia Frangou; Xavier Chitins; Steven C. R. Williams. Mapping IQ and gray matter density in healty young people. NeuroImage 23(8):800-805, 2004. PMID: 15528081. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2004.05.027. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 180.
Additional instructions differed according to the task: (i)visual detectionof the target without overt responses; (ii)immediate pointingto the most recent target in the sequence, and (iii)pointing to the previoustarget in the sequenceF. Lacquaniti; Daniela Perani; E. Guigon; V. Bettinardi; M. Carrozzo; F. Grassi; Yves Rossetti; F. Fazio. Visuomotor Transformations for Reaching to Memorized Targets: A PET study. NeuroImage 5(2):129-146, 1997. PMID: 9345543. DOI: 10.1006.nimg.1996.0254. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 182.
Our findings concur with normal psychophysical data and neuropsychological observations to suggest the recruitment of two overlapping but dissociable systems for the two tasks, and demonstrate functional heterogeneity within the left IFG (Broca's area), where the opercular portion is responsible for obtaining access to words through a phonemic/articulatory routeEraldo Paulesu; Ben Goldacre; Paola Scifo; Stefano F. Cappa; Maria Carla Gilardi; Isabella Castiglioni; Daniela Perani; Frruccio Fazio. Functional heterogeneity of left inferior frontal cortex as revealed by fMRI. NeuroReport 8(8):2011-2017, 1997. PMID: 9223094. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 185.
An association between the brain evoked response potentials and lying on the GKT suggests that deception may be associated with changes in other measures of brain activity such as regional blood flow that could be anatomically localized with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)Daniel D. Langleben; L. Schroeder; J. A. Maldjian; R. C. Gur; S. McDonald; J. D. Ragland; C. P. O'Brien; A. R. Childress. Brain Activity during Simulated Deception: An Event-Related Functional Magnetic Resonance Study. NeuroImage 15(3):727-732, 2002. PMID: 11848716. DOI: 10.1006/nimg.2001.1003. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 186.
Blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI contrasts between deceptive and truthful responses were measured with a 4 Tesla scanner in 18 participants performing the GKT and analyzed using statistical parametric mappingDaniel D. Langleben; L. Schroeder; J. A. Maldjian; R. C. Gur; S. McDonald; J. D. Ragland; C. P. O'Brien; A. R. Childress. Brain Activity during Simulated Deception: An Event-Related Functional Magnetic Resonance Study. NeuroImage 15(3):727-732, 2002. PMID: 11848716. DOI: 10.1006/nimg.2001.1003. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 186.
Increased activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the superior frontal gyrus (SFG), and the left premotor, motor, and anterior parietal cortex was specifically associated with deceptive responsesDaniel D. Langleben; L. Schroeder; J. A. Maldjian; R. C. Gur; S. McDonald; J. D. Ragland; C. P. O'Brien; A. R. Childress. Brain Activity during Simulated Deception: An Event-Related Functional Magnetic Resonance Study. NeuroImage 15(3):727-732, 2002. PMID: 11848716. DOI: 10.1006/nimg.2001.1003. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 186.
The results indicate that: (a) cognitive differences between deception and truth have neural correlates detectable by fMRI, (b) inhibition of the truthful response may be a basic component of intentional deception, and (c) ACC and SFG are components of the basic neural circuitry for deceptionDaniel D. Langleben; L. Schroeder; J. A. Maldjian; R. C. Gur; S. McDonald; J. D. Ragland; C. P. O'Brien; A. R. Childress. Brain Activity during Simulated Deception: An Event-Related Functional Magnetic Resonance Study. NeuroImage 15(3):727-732, 2002. PMID: 11848716. DOI: 10.1006/nimg.2001.1003. FMRIDCID: . WOBIB: 186.

Text count

Bib -> Asymmetry | Author | ICA | NMF | Novelty | Statistics | SVD | Title | WOBIB ]
Roi -> Alphabetic | Hammers | Tzourio-Mazoyer | Svarer | Top | Functional areas | Brodmann areas ]
[ Brede Database ]
Automatically constructed by Brede Toolbox through brede_roi_roi2html, 2006-10-05T15:36:57